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The Menopause Quiz
Hi there! Experiencing changes in your body, mood or periods? Tell us a little about yourself. We can help decode what you’re going through, help guide your journey through menopause, and recommend products that can help.

First things first. Please enter your age.
Let's talk about your period:
I have regular periods.
I’ve had my period within the last 3 months, but it’s been somewhat irregular.
It’s been irregular, but I’ve had at least 1 period in the last year.
I haven’t had a period in at least a year.
Could any outside factors have affected your period recently? E.g. birth control, hormone therapy, hysterectomy, chemotherapy, ablation, pregnancy, etc.
YES
NO
Have you experienced any of the following?
Vaginal
Dryness
Disrupted
Sleeping
Skin
Dryness
Hot Flashes
Night Sweats
Brain Fog
Mood Swings
Irritability
Fatigue
Painful Sex
Weight Gain
Lower Sex
Drive
Feeling Depressed
or Anxious
Thinning Hair/
Change in Texture
Sensitive
Bladder
Irregular
Periods
How much do they bother you?
Vaginal Dryness
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Disrupted Sleeping
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Skin Dryness
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Hot Flashes
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Night Sweats
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Brain Fog
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Mood Swings
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Irritability
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Fatigue
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Painful Sex
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Weight Gain
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Lower Sex Drive
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Feeling Depressed or Anxious
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Thinning Hair/ Change in Texture
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Sensitive Bladder
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Irregular Periods
Not at allSomewhatExtremely
Let's continue this conversation!
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Pre-Menopause

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Don’t toss the tampons just yet! Pre-menopause*1,2 is that 30-ish year stage in our lives that begins with our first period and ends at perimenopause—when we start having irregular periods because of...

Don’t toss the tampons just yet! Pre-menopause*1,2 is that 30-ish year stage in our lives that begins with our first period and ends at perimenopause—when we start having irregular periods because of declining estrogen levels.

Fun fact: a woman can spend more than 2,000 days of her life bleeding! (Wait, is that fact actually “fun”? Hmmmm. We digress.)

But since you’re here, you probably want to know what you can do now to prepare for perimenopause. Good news. All you have to do is enjoy life and treat your body like the temple you know it is. Your health care provider can give you some good ideas about how to best support a healthy, active lifestyle through exercise and diet to prep for the big change.

Scroll down to see a roadmap of the menopause journey and what you can expect during each stage.

Notice: Kindra does not provide medical or health care advice. our employees and other representatives are not physicians or health care clinicians. you should consult your personal physician for any medical and/or other health care advice before acting on any information provided by Kindra or any other source.

Continue Reading

Early Perimenopause

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Changes are on their way, but not just yet in early perimenopause.1,2 “Peri” is a fancy word for “near,” meaning you’re on your way to menopause—the point at which you haven’t had...

Changes are on their way, but not just yet in early perimenopause.1,2 “Peri” is a fancy word for “near,” meaning you’re on your way to menopause—the point at which you haven’t had a period for 12 months.

Perimenopause is divided into two stages: early and late. Early perimenopause, or early peri for short, begins several years before menopause, and lasts until you’ve gone three straight months without a period.

During early peri, your ovaries gradually start producing less estrogen, which causes your periods to become irregular. Most women begin to see signs of early peri in their 40s, but some start in their 30s or even earlier.

So, what are the signs of early peri? Hot flashes, mood swings, irregular periods, difficulty concentrating, insomnia, and fatigue. But these symptoms aren’t a one-size-fits-all kind of thing—some women may experience all of them or none of them, some women are extremely bothered by them, and others aren’t bothered by them at all.

Bottom line: everyone’s menopause experience is unique, and no matter what you’re going through, we’re here to help! Scroll down to learn more about your symptoms and how to find help.

Notice: Kindra does not provide medical or health care advice. our employees and other representatives are not physicians or health care clinicians. you should consult your personal physician for any medical and/or other health care advice before acting on any information provided by Kindra or any other source.

Continue Reading

Late Perimenopause

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“The Change” is getting closer in late perimenopause.1,2 “Peri” is a fancy word for “near,” meaning you’re on your way to menopause—the point at which you haven’t had a period for 12...

“The Change” is getting closer in late perimenopause.1,2 “Peri” is a fancy word for “near,” meaning you’re on your way to menopause—the point at which you haven’t had a period for 12 months.

Perimenopause is divided into two stages: early and late. During early perimenopause, your body starts to produce less estrogen. During late perimenopause, or late peri for short, estrogen declines even further, making your periods even more irregular. Late peri officially begins when you have skipped three or more cycles and have stopped bleeding entirely for more than 90 days.

Estrogen is some powerful stuff, and its decline throws a major wrench in a woman’s body as it tries to figure out its new normal. For many women, symptoms that started in early peri—like hot flashes, mood swings, brain fog, insomnia, and fatigue—can increase in both frequency and severity during late peri. But, these symptoms aren’t a one-size-fits-all kind of thing—some women may experience all of them or none of them, some women are extremely bothered by them, and others aren’t bothered by them at all.

Bottom line: everyone’s menopause experience is unique, and no matter what you’re going through, we’re here to help! Scroll down to learn more about your symptoms and how to find help.

Notice: Kindra does not provide medical or health care advice. our employees and other representatives are not physicians or health care clinicians. you should consult your personal physician for any medical and/or other health care advice before acting on any information provided by Kindra or any other source.

Continue Reading

Post-Menopause

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Welcome to the next chapter of your life!

Post-menopause1,2 begins the moment you reach menopause (the point at which you’ve gone 12 consecutive months without a period) and continues for the rest...

Welcome to the next chapter of your life!

Post-menopause1,2 begins the moment you reach menopause (the point at which you’ve gone 12 consecutive months without a period) and continues for the rest of your life. And there’s good news—many women in post-menopause*1,2 experience a reduction (or even elimination) of earlier symptoms like hot flashes, brain fog, mood swings, insomnia, etc. Phew.

You start to feel that relief when your body gets used to lower levels of estrogen and has stabilized to a new “normal.” Though, for some women, this new low level of estrogen can mean noticeable changes in symptoms, like vaginal dryness and bladder leakage. But, these symptoms aren’t a one-size-fits-all kind of thing—some women may experience all of them or none of them, some women are extremely bothered by them, and others aren’t bothered by them at all.

Bottom line: everyone’s menopause experience is unique, and no matter what you’re going through, we’re here to help! Scroll down to learn more about your symptoms and how to find help.

Notice: Kindra does not provide medical or health care advice. our employees and other representatives are not physicians or health care clinicians. you should consult your personal physician for any medical and/or other health care advice before acting on any information provided by Kindra or any other source.

Continue Reading

It’s Complicated...

Download Results
Your download will begin soon.

Your exact stage in menopause can’t be pinpointed. Irregular periods are the easiest way to identify your menopause stage, but since you’ve experienced something that may have impacted your period, it’s hard...

Your exact stage in menopause can’t be pinpointed. Irregular periods are the easiest way to identify your menopause stage, but since you’ve experienced something that may have impacted your period, it’s hard to estimate where you are in your menopause journey. But don’t fret. Although your stage of menopause is unclear, you can still get help managing your symptoms.

It’s also worth noting that for some women whose bodies stop producing estrogen suddenly, menopause may seem to happen overnight. This sudden change in the body’s estrogen levels causes many women feel menopausal symptoms like hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, and brain fog more abruptly. Tons of fun, we know.

Of course, these symptoms aren’t one-size-fits-all—some women may experience all of them or none of them, some women are extremely bothered by them, and others aren’t bothered by them at all.

Bottom line: everyone’s menopause experience is unique, and no matter what you’re going through, we’re here to help! Scroll down to learn more about your symptoms and how to find recommendations.

Notice: Kindra does not provide medical or health care advice. our employees and other representatives are not physicians or health care clinicians. you should consult your personal physician for any medical and/or other health care advice before acting on any information provided by Kindra or any other source.

Continue Reading

The Symptom Decoder

Disrupted Sleeping
How is this related to menopause?

Starting in early menopause, some women experience sleeplessness. Night sweats as well as disturbances by noise and light can all contribute to disrupted sleep. *3

What can you do?

Reduce nighttime disruptions with sleep masks and earplugs, so once you fall asleep, you stay asleep.

Hot Flashes
How is this related to menopause?

As many as 75% of women experience hot flashes in menopause—a rapid, spontaneous feeling of warmth that can cause profuse perspiration.

During a hot flash, your brain mistakenly senses that your body is too warm and sends a signal to cool you down immediately. Your blood vessels expand, causing you to sweat. Some women may also experience a flushed, red look.*4

What can you do?

Doctors are still trying to find the exact cause of hot flashes. But you can take additional measures to stay cool: turn down the thermostat, use cool wicking fabrics for clothes and sheets, turn on a fan, and have cold water available.

Fatigue
How is this related to menopause?

Some women experience sleep disturbances around the time of menopause. In general, both women and men report less restful sleep as they get older. In addition, sleep disturbances caused by night sweats can also cause fatigue.

Most adults require 6-9 hours of sleep each night. You know you are getting enough sleep if you can function in an alert state during your desired waking hours. Growing evidence shows how important sleep is for good health and daytime functioning.*5

What can you do?

Be mindful of and address factors that can interfere with restful sleep, like stress, feeling anxious, and night sweats.

Adopt good sleep hygiene—follow a regular sleep schedule, stay cool at night, use a sleep mask and earplugs, and get regular exercise, and try relaxation techniques, just to name a few.

Weight Gain
How is this related to menopause?

The hormonal changes of menopause combined with the slower metabolism associated with general aging may cause your body to carry weight differently.*6

What can you do?

Talk with your doctor, nutritionist, or dietician about how to eat a healthy, varied diet to get the nutrition you need and maintain a healthy weight.

Mood Swings
How is this related to menopause?

Changes in estrogen levels during “the change” can make our emotions unpredictable, which can leave us feeling weepy, angry, anxious or stressed.*7

You’re not imagining things and you’re definitely not alone—nearly 1 in 4 of all women in early menopause have experienced mood swings to some degree.*7

What can you do?

Prioritize taking the time to take care of yourself! A few minutes of YOU time can go a long way in making you feel cool, calm, and collected.

Night Sweats
How is this related to menopause?

Night sweats are menopausal hot flashes that happen in your sleep. Night sweats occur when your brain mistakenly senses that your body is too warm and sends a signal to cool you down immediately. Your blood vessels expand, giving off extra heat. Your blood vessels expand, causing you to sweat. Even if the hot flash doesn’t wake you, being drenched with sweat and the associated cold chill that follows often does.*8

What can you do?

Doctors are still trying to find the exact cause of night sweats. But you can take additional measures to stay cool: turn down the thermostat, use cool wicking fabrics for clothes and sheets, turn on a fan, and have cold water available.

Brain Fog
How is this related to menopause?

Starting with the onset of menopause, some women find it harder to concentrate and have trouble remembering things. Although memory and mental abilities naturally change with age, the stress and sleeplessness associated with menopause can affect overall brain function.*9

What can you do?

Talk to your doctor if you have any concerns about memory issues or declining mental performance.

Feeling Depressed or Anxious
How is this related to menopause?

If you’re feeling a little more down in the dumps or hyper-stressed when dealing with everyday things, you’re not alone. In fact, nearly 1 in 4 women in menopause are in the same boat.

Menopause often occurs during a time in our lives when we may be facing other major transitions like retirement or career changes, divorce, caring for aging parents, or empty-nesting. (Or reverse empty-nesting if your adult child returns home.)

The hormonal changes and mood swings caused by menopause can make facing these challenges feel even more difficult and leave you feeling sad or anxious.*10

What can you do?

Talk to your doctor about any concerns you have about feeling sad or anxious.

Lower Sex Drive
How is this related to menopause?

Vaginal dryness, hormonal changes, stress, fatigue, and disrupted sleep associated with menopause can all interfere with libido.*11

What can you do?

Take the time to consider what a healthy, satisfying sex life would be for you—whether that’s with a partner or without.

Vaginal Dryness
How is this related to menopause?

The loss of estrogen during menopause can cause vaginal skin—both inside and outside—to become thinner, drier, less elastic, and more fragile.

The vagina will often feel drier than before menopause. In fact, many women experience discomfort when wiping, walking, or even sitting and other everyday activities.*12

What can you do?

Search for products specifically formulated to relieve and improve vaginal dryness.

Irritability
How is this related to menopause?

Changes in estrogen levels during “the change” can make our emotions unpredictable, which can leave us feeling weepy, angry, anxious or stressed.*13. You’re not imagining things and you’re definitely not alone—nearly 1 in 4 of all women in early menopause have experienced mood swings to some degree.*13

What can you do?

Try to focus on small ways to improve your overall health and well-being. Making time for relaxation can help you manage stress.

Skin Dryness
How is this related to menopause?

During menopause women may feel like their skin is drier than ever. That’s all thanks to loss of estrogen, which also causes us to lose collagen in our skin. These decreased collagen levels can cause our skin to sag and feel dry and flaky, day after day.*14 The result? You may notice that your favorite lotion is no longer working like it used to.

What can you do?

Find products designed with the special needs of menopausal skin in mind.

Apply lotion after bathing, showering, or washing your hands to help skin stay hydrated and more resistant to damage.

Sensitive Bladder
How is this related to menopause?

As we age, the muscles supporting our bladders weaken, making it more difficult to ‘hold it in.’ Small jostles from everyday activities like coughing, sneezing, laughing, and walking can lead to accidental leakages—a common complaint for 50% of women in early menopause. In post-menopause, when our bladder function tends to decline, some women also experience sudden urges to go to the bathroom which can lead to more accidental leakages.*15

What can you do?

Talk to your doctor about your bladder. They can help diagnose your specific concerns and craft a personal treatment plan from the variety of options currently available.

The good news? Treatment can greatly reduce or even cure the problem. So feel free to laugh and sneeze and jog without worrying.

Thinning Hair/Change In Texture
How is this related to menopause?

During menopause, women may experience changes in hair texture. As our estrogen and progesterone levels decline, the health of our hair also declines—hair can become thinner and more brittle, resulting in overall hair loss and lackluster locks.*16

What can you do?

Take care of your hair inside and out. Eat a healthy nutritious diet, and use nourishing or strengthening shampoos and conditioners that are gentle on brittle hair to prevent breakage.

You might also want to avoid harsh chemical styling products as they can make hair even more fragile.

Painful Sex
How is this related to menopause?

During menopause, the loss of estrogen, can cause vaginal skin—both inside and out—to become thinner, drier, less elastic, and more fragile. As we age, vaginal moisture diminishes, resulting in less lubrication.

This combination of fragile skin and decreased lubrication increases the likelihood of the vagina tearing or bleeding during sex.*17 No wonder many menopausal women say sex is less pleasurable or even intolerable.

What can you do?

Talk to your doctor about any pain or discomfort you are experiencing.

Take the time to consider what a healthy, satisfying sex life would be for you—whether that’s with a partner or without.

Irregular Periods
How is this related to menopause?

A normal menstrual cycle lasts 28 days, plus or minus seven days. A period is considered irregular if it occurs more frequently than every 21 days or lasts longer than 8 days.

A few women simply stop menstruating one day and never have another period. However, about 90% of women experience 4-8 years of menstrual cycle changes before periods are gone for good.*18

What can you do?

Talk to your doctor about any changes in your menstrual cycle. They can help you figure out if you are experiencing irregular periods that are part of a normal, healthy progression through menopause.

Explore the Whole Journey

Here’s a fun fact—the average US woman spends about one-third of her life in menopause, from perimenopause through post-menopause. Want to know what to expect during each stage? Keep reading.

Help Manage Menopause at Every Stage

Hot? Dry? Moody? Oh my! Thankfully, our products can help you feel like there are fewer disruptions in your life.

Shop Now

Pre-Menopause

Download Results
Your download will begin soon.

Don’t toss the tampons just yet! Pre-menopause*1,2 is that 30-ish year stage in our lives that begins with our first period and ends at perimenopause—when we start having irregular periods because of...

Don’t toss the tampons just yet! Pre-menopause*1,2 is that 30-ish year stage in our lives that begins with our first period and ends at perimenopause—when we start having irregular periods because of declining estrogen levels.

Fun fact: a woman can spend more than 2,000 days of her life bleeding! (Wait, is that fact actually “fun”? Hmmmm. We digress.)

But since you’re here, you probably want to know what you can do now to prepare for perimenopause. Good news. All you have to do is enjoy life and treat your body like the temple you know it is. Your health care provider can give you some good ideas about how to best support a healthy, active lifestyle through exercise and diet to prep for the big change.

Scroll down to see a roadmap of the menopause journey and what you can expect during each stage.

Notice: Kindra does not provide medical or health care advice. our employees and other representatives are not physicians or health care clinicians. you should consult your personal physician for any medical and/or other health care advice before acting on any information provided by Kindra or any other source.

Continue Reading

Early Perimenopause

Download Results
Your download will begin soon.

Changes are on their way, but not just yet in early perimenopause.1,2 “Peri” is a fancy word for “near,” meaning you’re on your way to menopause—the point at which you haven’t had...

Changes are on their way, but not just yet in early perimenopause.1,2 “Peri” is a fancy word for “near,” meaning you’re on your way to menopause—the point at which you haven’t had a period for 12 months.

Perimenopause is divided into two stages: early and late. Early perimenopause, or early peri for short, begins several years before menopause, and lasts until you’ve gone three straight months without a period.

During early peri, your ovaries gradually start producing less estrogen, which causes your periods to become irregular. Most women begin to see signs of early peri in their 40s, but some start in their 30s or even earlier.

So, what are the signs of early peri? Hot flashes, mood swings, irregular periods, difficulty concentrating, insomnia, and fatigue. But these symptoms aren’t a one-size-fits-all kind of thing—some women may experience all of them or none of them, some women are extremely bothered by them, and others aren’t bothered by them at all.

Bottom line: everyone’s menopause experience is unique, and no matter what you’re going through, we’re here to help! Scroll down to learn more about your symptoms and how to find help.

Notice: Kindra does not provide medical or health care advice. our employees and other representatives are not physicians or health care clinicians. you should consult your personal physician for any medical and/or other health care advice before acting on any information provided by Kindra or any other source.

Continue Reading

Late Perimenopause

Download Results
Your download will begin soon.

“The Change” is getting closer in late perimenopause.1,2 “Peri” is a fancy word for “near,” meaning you’re on your way to menopause—the point at which you haven’t had a period for 12...

“The Change” is getting closer in late perimenopause.1,2 “Peri” is a fancy word for “near,” meaning you’re on your way to menopause—the point at which you haven’t had a period for 12 months.

Perimenopause is divided into two stages: early and late. During early perimenopause, your body starts to produce less estrogen. During late perimenopause, or late peri for short, estrogen declines even further, making your periods even more irregular. Late peri officially begins when you have skipped three or more cycles and have stopped bleeding entirely for more than 90 days.

Estrogen is some powerful stuff, and its decline throws a major wrench in a woman’s body as it tries to figure out its new normal. For many women, symptoms that started in early peri—like hot flashes, mood swings, brain fog, insomnia, and fatigue—can increase in both frequency and severity during late peri. But, these symptoms aren’t a one-size-fits-all kind of thing—some women may experience all of them or none of them, some women are extremely bothered by them, and others aren’t bothered by them at all.

Bottom line: everyone’s menopause experience is unique, and no matter what you’re going through, we’re here to help! Scroll down to learn more about your symptoms and how to find help.

Notice: Kindra does not provide medical or health care advice. our employees and other representatives are not physicians or health care clinicians. you should consult your personal physician for any medical and/or other health care advice before acting on any information provided by Kindra or any other source.

Continue Reading

Post-Menopause

Download Results
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Welcome to the next chapter of your life!

Post-menopause1,2 begins the moment you reach menopause (the point at which you’ve gone 12 consecutive months without a period) and continues for the rest...

Welcome to the next chapter of your life!

Post-menopause1,2 begins the moment you reach menopause (the point at which you’ve gone 12 consecutive months without a period) and continues for the rest of your life. And there’s good news—many women in post-menopause*1,2 experience a reduction (or even elimination) of earlier symptoms like hot flashes, brain fog, mood swings, insomnia, etc. Phew.

You start to feel that relief when your body gets used to lower levels of estrogen and has stabilized to a new “normal.” Though, for some women, this new low level of estrogen can mean noticeable changes in symptoms, like vaginal dryness and bladder leakage. But, these symptoms aren’t a one-size-fits-all kind of thing—some women may experience all of them or none of them, some women are extremely bothered by them, and others aren’t bothered by them at all.

Bottom line: everyone’s menopause experience is unique, and no matter what you’re going through, we’re here to help! Scroll down to learn more about your symptoms and how to find help.

Notice: Kindra does not provide medical or health care advice. our employees and other representatives are not physicians or health care clinicians. you should consult your personal physician for any medical and/or other health care advice before acting on any information provided by Kindra or any other source.

Continue Reading

It’s Complicated...

Download Results
Your download will begin soon.

Your exact stage in menopause can’t be pinpointed. Irregular periods are the easiest way to identify your menopause stage, but since you’ve experienced something that may have impacted your period, it’s hard...

Your exact stage in menopause can’t be pinpointed. Irregular periods are the easiest way to identify your menopause stage, but since you’ve experienced something that may have impacted your period, it’s hard to estimate where you are in your menopause journey. But don’t fret. Although your stage of menopause is unclear, you can still get help managing your symptoms.

It’s also worth noting that for some women whose bodies stop producing estrogen suddenly, menopause may seem to happen overnight. This sudden change in the body’s estrogen levels causes many women feel menopausal symptoms like hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, and brain fog more abruptly. Tons of fun, we know.

Of course, these symptoms aren’t one-size-fits-all—some women may experience all of them or none of them, some women are extremely bothered by them, and others aren’t bothered by them at all.

Bottom line: everyone’s menopause experience is unique, and no matter what you’re going through, we’re here to help! Scroll down to learn more about your symptoms and how to find recommendations.

Notice: Kindra does not provide medical or health care advice. our employees and other representatives are not physicians or health care clinicians. you should consult your personal physician for any medical and/or other health care advice before acting on any information provided by Kindra or any other source.

Continue Reading

The Symptom Decoder

Disrupted Sleeping
How is this related to menopause?

Starting in early menopause, some women experience sleeplessness. Night sweats as well as disturbances by noise and light can all contribute to disrupted sleep. *3

What can you do?

Reduce nighttime disruptions with sleep masks and earplugs, so once you fall asleep, you stay asleep.

Hot Flashes
How is this related to menopause?

As many as 75% of women experience hot flashes in menopause—a rapid, spontaneous feeling of warmth that can cause profuse perspiration.

During a hot flash, your brain mistakenly senses that your body is too warm and sends a signal to cool you down immediately. Your blood vessels expand, causing you to sweat. Some women may also experience a flushed, red look.*4

What can you do?

Doctors are still trying to find the exact cause of hot flashes. But you can take additional measures to stay cool: turn down the thermostat, use cool wicking fabrics for clothes and sheets, turn on a fan, and have cold water available.

Fatigue
How is this related to menopause?

Some women experience sleep disturbances around the time of menopause. In general, both women and men report less restful sleep as they get older. In addition, sleep disturbances caused by night sweats can also cause fatigue.

Most adults require 6-9 hours of sleep each night. You know you are getting enough sleep if you can function in an alert state during your desired waking hours. Growing evidence shows how important sleep is for good health and daytime functioning.*5

What can you do?

Be mindful of and address factors that can interfere with restful sleep, like stress, feeling anxious, and night sweats.

Adopt good sleep hygiene—follow a regular sleep schedule, stay cool at night, use a sleep mask and earplugs, and get regular exercise, and try relaxation techniques, just to name a few.

Weight Gain
How is this related to menopause?

The hormonal changes of menopause combined with the slower metabolism associated with general aging may cause your body to carry weight differently.*6

What can you do?

Talk with your doctor, nutritionist, or dietician about how to eat a healthy, varied diet to get the nutrition you need and maintain a healthy weight.

Mood Swings
How is this related to menopause?

Changes in estrogen levels during “the change” can make our emotions unpredictable, which can leave us feeling weepy, angry, anxious or stressed.*7

You’re not imagining things and you’re definitely not alone—nearly 1 in 4 of all women in early menopause have experienced mood swings to some degree.*7

What can you do?

Prioritize taking the time to take care of yourself! A few minutes of YOU time can go a long way in making you feel cool, calm, and collected.

Night Sweats
How is this related to menopause?

Night sweats are menopausal hot flashes that happen in your sleep. Night sweats occur when your brain mistakenly senses that your body is too warm and sends a signal to cool you down immediately. Your blood vessels expand, giving off extra heat. Your blood vessels expand, causing you to sweat. Even if the hot flash doesn’t wake you, being drenched with sweat and the associated cold chill that follows often does.*8

What can you do?

Doctors are still trying to find the exact cause of night sweats. But you can take additional measures to stay cool: turn down the thermostat, use cool wicking fabrics for clothes and sheets, turn on a fan, and have cold water available.

Brain Fog
How is this related to menopause?

Starting with the onset of menopause, some women find it harder to concentrate and have trouble remembering things. Although memory and mental abilities naturally change with age, the stress and sleeplessness associated with menopause can affect overall brain function.*9

What can you do?

Talk to your doctor if you have any concerns about memory issues or declining mental performance.

Feeling Depressed or Anxious
How is this related to menopause?

If you’re feeling a little more down in the dumps or hyper-stressed when dealing with everyday things, you’re not alone. In fact, nearly 1 in 4 women in menopause are in the same boat.

Menopause often occurs during a time in our lives when we may be facing other major transitions like retirement or career changes, divorce, caring for aging parents, or empty-nesting. (Or reverse empty-nesting if your adult child returns home.)

The hormonal changes and mood swings caused by menopause can make facing these challenges feel even more difficult and leave you feeling sad or anxious.*10

What can you do?

Talk to your doctor about any concerns you have about feeling sad or anxious.

Lower Sex Drive
How is this related to menopause?

Vaginal dryness, hormonal changes, stress, fatigue, and disrupted sleep associated with menopause can all interfere with libido.*11

What can you do?

Take the time to consider what a healthy, satisfying sex life would be for you—whether that’s with a partner or without.

Vaginal Dryness
How is this related to menopause?

The loss of estrogen during menopause can cause vaginal skin—both inside and outside—to become thinner, drier, less elastic, and more fragile.

The vagina will often feel drier than before menopause. In fact, many women experience discomfort when wiping, walking, or even sitting and other everyday activities.*12

What can you do?

Search for products specifically formulated to relieve and improve vaginal dryness.

Irritability
How is this related to menopause?

Changes in estrogen levels during “the change” can make our emotions unpredictable, which can leave us feeling weepy, angry, anxious or stressed.*13. You’re not imagining things and you’re definitely not alone—nearly 1 in 4 of all women in early menopause have experienced mood swings to some degree.*13

What can you do?

Try to focus on small ways to improve your overall health and well-being. Making time for relaxation can help you manage stress.

Skin Dryness
How is this related to menopause?

During menopause women may feel like their skin is drier than ever. That’s all thanks to loss of estrogen, which also causes us to lose collagen in our skin. These decreased collagen levels can cause our skin to sag and feel dry and flaky, day after day.*14 The result? You may notice that your favorite lotion is no longer working like it used to.

What can you do?

Find products designed with the special needs of menopausal skin in mind.

Apply lotion after bathing, showering, or washing your hands to help skin stay hydrated and more resistant to damage.

Sensitive Bladder
How is this related to menopause?

As we age, the muscles supporting our bladders weaken, making it more difficult to ‘hold it in.’ Small jostles from everyday activities like coughing, sneezing, laughing, and walking can lead to accidental leakages—a common complaint for 50% of women in early menopause. In post-menopause, when our bladder function tends to decline, some women also experience sudden urges to go to the bathroom which can lead to more accidental leakages.*15

What can you do?

Talk to your doctor about your bladder. They can help diagnose your specific concerns and craft a personal treatment plan from the variety of options currently available.

The good news? Treatment can greatly reduce or even cure the problem. So feel free to laugh and sneeze and jog without worrying.

Thinning Hair/Change In Texture
How is this related to menopause?

During menopause, women may experience changes in hair texture. As our estrogen and progesterone levels decline, the health of our hair also declines—hair can become thinner and more brittle, resulting in overall hair loss and lackluster locks.*16

What can you do?

Take care of your hair inside and out. Eat a healthy nutritious diet, and use nourishing or strengthening shampoos and conditioners that are gentle on brittle hair to prevent breakage.

You might also want to avoid harsh chemical styling products as they can make hair even more fragile.

Painful Sex
How is this related to menopause?

During menopause, the loss of estrogen, can cause vaginal skin—both inside and out—to become thinner, drier, less elastic, and more fragile. As we age, vaginal moisture diminishes, resulting in less lubrication.

This combination of fragile skin and decreased lubrication increases the likelihood of the vagina tearing or bleeding during sex.*17 No wonder many menopausal women say sex is less pleasurable or even intolerable.

What can you do?

Talk to your doctor about any pain or discomfort you are experiencing.

Take the time to consider what a healthy, satisfying sex life would be for you—whether that’s with a partner or without.

Irregular Periods
How is this related to menopause?

A normal menstrual cycle lasts 28 days, plus or minus seven days. A period is considered irregular if it occurs more frequently than every 21 days or lasts longer than 8 days.

A few women simply stop menstruating one day and never have another period. However, about 90% of women experience 4-8 years of menstrual cycle changes before periods are gone for good.*18

What can you do?

Talk to your doctor about any changes in your menstrual cycle. They can help you figure out if you are experiencing irregular periods that are part of a normal, healthy progression through menopause.

Explore the Whole Journey

Here’s a fun fact—the average US woman spends about one-third of her life in menopause, from perimenopause through post-menopause. Want to know what to expect during each stage? Keep reading.
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