Connection

Holiday Bites Made Menopause-Friendly

True wellness begins with a holistic approach. While supplements, mental wellness, and regular exercise can do wonders for the body, nothing compares to filling your plate with plant-based foods rich in vitamins and nutrients. Yet, we know the holidays exist as a season of temptations. It isn’t always intriguing to eat for health during this season and thanks to the likely shift in holiday traditions this year, eating for comfort probably sounds much more appealing. What if there’s a way to do both? Hear us out. We’ve found some recipes that honor holiday traditions while offering some much needed TLC. 

 

Christmas Brussels Sprouts with Cranberries, Walnuts, and Bacon

When vegetables come together with bacon, it is bound to be a good time. Dr. Susan E. Brown applauds the star of this dish, brussel sprouts, thanks to its high levels of vitamin K. According to Dr. Brown, vitamin K “has a big capacity to reduce menopausal bone loss.” Not a huge fan of brussels? Explore recipes with spinach, kale, or broccoli to get those same bone-supporting benefits. 

Find the recipe here.
 

Classic Thanksgiving Sweet Potatoes


This recipe is a little naughty and a little nice, which honestly is the least we can hope for from this holiday season. Don’t let looks deceive you, though. The topping is a surprisingly simple meringue, rather than sugary marshmallows. Best of all? This recipe is packed with superpowers when it comes to health benefits. Sweet potatoes are filled with beta carotene, also known as plant-based vitamin A. This means they are especially powerful in supporting the immune system and overall cardiovascular health, two key parts of being that need some extra love during the menopausal transition. Sweet potatoes are also high in vitamin B6, C, potassium, and fiber, lending them bonus points as powerful superfoods. 

Find the recipe here.
 

Calcium-Rich Collard Greens

This southern comfort food is filled with health benefits. We’re often told to seek calcium through milk and various dairy products. However, that isn’t always the best option and can cause digestive upsets. As a general rule of thumb, keep in mind that dark, leafy greens are wonderful for your health and are often high in calcium. Besides, greens can hold a substantial amount of your daily needed calcium. One cup of cooked collard greens has 266mg of calcium - that is nearly a quarter of the recommended daily intake (28 grams). Best of all, they compliment some stuffing, turkey, or even ham perfectly throughout the holiday season.

Find the recipe here.


 
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