Science-backed menopause support, made by women and tailored to you.

Clinically backed ingredients

Innovating through the latest technical advancements

Synthesizing research to provide non-hormonal, non-RX, drug-free solutions

Our Process

Every product and initiative is rooted in science, through clinically-studied ingredients, and in depth research for women in peri and post menopause. We partner with top tier advisors and world-class manufacturers.

Clinically studied ingredients

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Developed by experts

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Physician backed

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Learn more about our partners

The Science of Menopause

What is it, and what are the symptoms? We’re so glad you asked.

Menopause refers to the time when your body no longer has periods. This happens when your ovaries stop making estrogen, a key sex hormone that affects your menstrual cycle, fertility, and many other bodily functions. [1] You’ve officially experienced menopause once you’ve gone 12 months without a period — which happens to most women in their early 50s.


Women can also experience menopause as a side effect of medical treatment, such as surgery to remove the ovaries or chemo or radiation treatment for cancer (which may damage the ovaries). They’ll likely also experience menopause symptoms, but they potentially may be more severe than people who go through natural menopause. [6]

The years leading up to menopause, called perimenopause or the menopausal transition, are when the amount of estrogen and other sex hormones produced by your body start to fluctuate and decline. (It usually starts in a woman’s mid-40s, and can last for seven years or longer.) [3] This is when many women experience symptoms like hot flashes, irregular periods, vaginal dryness, irritability, trouble sleeping, and other menopause symptoms. [4, 5]

The years of a woman’s life after her final period are considered postmenopause. [7] Sex hormone levels remain naturally low (but consistent) and in many cases, frustrating menopause symptoms ease up or go away altogether. Some postmenopausal women experience menopause symptoms for years after their last period. [8]

Fun fact: There are 34 major symptoms of menopause that you may experience during the transition. But some of the most common include:

- Irregular, heavier, or longer periods. Blame fluctuating levels of estrogen and progesterone, which control the menstrual cycle. [23, 24, 25]

- Hot flashes, uddenly feeling intensely hot all over your body — are likely caused in part by fluctuating estrogen levels. [26]

- Vaginal atrophy: The lining of the vagina becomes thinner, drier, and more sensitive. This is caused by a drop in estrogen levels, which helps lubricate vaginal tissues. It can be extremely uncomfortable and make sex (or even routine gynecological care) painful and unpleasant. [29]

- Mood changes: Many women report feeling unusually irritable during perimenopause. [33]) Research is limited as to why this is, but experts believe that declining estrogen levels — which helps make the mood-regulating hormone serotonin — could play a role in perimenopausal mood changes. [34]

- Sleep issues: Many perimenopausal women have issues sleeping [35], often due to other menopause symptoms like hot flashes, mood disorders, and fluctuating hormone levels. [36]

- Other symptoms of menopause you might experience include body odor changes, heart palpitations, headaches or migraines, and more. These symptoms are generally caused, either directly or indirectly, by declining estrogen levels.

The menopause transition is a huge shift that can affect your entire body as well as your mental well-being. But some of the most significant — and in some cases, painful — changes can happen to your genital area.


Estrogen, among many other functions, helps keep the tissues of your vagina and vulva (the external area surrounding your vagina, including your labia and the opening of the vagina) lubricated and elastic. After menopause, your body’s estrogen levels are very low, which makes the lining of the vagina thinner and drier. The vagina itself might even narrow and shorten. [41] These physical changes to your vagina and vulva can cause a host of issues including itching, burning, pain during sex, vaginal atrophy (drying, thinning, and inflammation of the vagina) [42], and even bladder issues like stress incontinence and frequent UTIs — a condition known as genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM). [43] Research estimates that as many as 70 percent of postmenopausal women have GSM. [44]


Other postmenopausal women may suffer from vulvodynia, a chronic pain condition that affects the vulva.[45] This can happen at any age, and causes stinging, burning, and irritation in the skin of the vulva itself as well as pain during sex.[46] Less is known about what causes vulvodynia, but experts believe that hormonal changes (like the ones that happen during menopause) may contribute to it. [47]

We developed a quiz to help you identify what phase of menopause you are in and we also share helpful resources along with our recommended products. You can take our quiz here.

Hello, Hormones

There are a few key sex hormones whose functioning (and decline) affects menopause and its symptoms:

Estrogen

Progesterone

Follicle-stimulating hormone

The Kindra Care Plan

We’re your team — and as we build a service for you, our friends, our siblings, and ourselves, we’re here to answer any questions you have, talk through anything that's on your mind, and get you the answers and support you need. We can't wait to meet you.

  • A personalized menopause assessment

  • Support, always

  • Plant-powered, estrogen-free solutions

  • Information to share with your doctor

  • A place to connect

Meet our Physicians

Dr. Suzanne

Dr. Suzanne B. Gilberg-Lenz is an obstetrician-gynecologist in Beverly Hills, California and is affiliated with Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. She received her medical degree from University of Southern California School of Medicine and has been in practice for more than 20 years.

Dr. Seema Shah

Dr. Shah graduated from the Sidney Kimmel Medical College At Thomas Jefferson University in 2002. She works in Oakland, CA and 2 other locations and specializes in Obstetrics & Gynecology. Dr. Shah is affiliated with Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center.

the science of our products

The Daily Vaginal Lotion


Kindra’s Daily Vaginal Lotion restores moisture to your vulvar and vaginal tissues while repairing the skin barrier in those areas. It can help address some key symptoms of vulvar/vaginal dryness or atrophy that can happen during or after menopause, such as mild to moderate dryness, discomfort, and painful intimacy.


The estrogen your body makes helps keep your vaginal tissue lubricated, stretchy, and strong. As your ovaries stop producing estrogen during perimenopause, your intimate areas can become dry, sensitive, thin, and narrow. [1]


Instead of addressing these changes with hormones — a commonly-prescribed treatment for menopause-related vaginal dryness and atrophy — Kindra’s Daily Vaginal Lotion uses other safe, clinically-backed ingredients to soothe sensitive vaginal and vulvar skin and restore moisture to the area.

95% of women who tried the lotion for 3 days reported meaningful improvement in vaginal dryness


Niacinamide: Niacinamide is a form of vitamin B3, a water-soluble vitamin. [2, 3]. Decades of research have shown that when applied topically, niacinamide can strengthen the skin barrier (boosting your skin’s ability to keep moisture in and germs out) and improve skin elasticity [2, 4, 5] — making it a natural choice for our Lotion.

Vitamin E: This fat-soluble vitamin acts like an antioxidant in the body. In the skin, it may keep you from losing moisture. [x] We wanted it in our Lotion because research has shown vitamin E can help restore vaginal tissue health in post-menopausal women almost as well as estrogen. [6]


Coconut oil: Coconut oil is rich in saturated fats [x], making it an incredibly hydrating natural skin-care ingredient. A double-blind clinical trial found that coconut oil significantly improved skin hydration in people with abnormally dry skin [7].


Hyaluronic Acid: This molecule is naturally produced by your body to keep your skin hydrated and flexible. [8] Research shows that hyaluronic acid may be as effective as estrogen to help address symptoms of vaginal atrophy like dry skin, changes in vaginal pH, and painful sex [9x], which is why we included it in our Lotion.

the science of our products

Our Supplements

Kindra currently offers three supplements to support your health and minimize certain symptoms during the menopause transition and beyond. They are: The Core Supplement: Taken daily to support healthy circulation, mental clarity, skin health, stress reduction, and libido. The Sleep Enhancing Supplement: Taken as needed to address poor sleep and night sweats. The Focus Supplement: Taken daily to help manage brain fog, fatigue, hot flashes, and night sweats.

Pycnogenol: A hero ingredient in all three of our supplements, Pycnogenol is the brand name for French maritime pine bark extract. This natural ingredient has been shown in several studies to help improve certain signs and symptoms of menopause, including improvement in hot flashes, sleep issues, anxiety and irritability, and libido — making ideal for our supplement lines. [1,2] Decades of research has demonstrated its safety (with low risk of side effects) for most people. [3]


Sensoril Ashwagandha: Ashwagandha (also known as Withania somnifera) is a plant from India with a long history of medicinal use in Ayurvedic medicine.[x] Current scientific research has shown that ashwagandha extract can help reduce the symptoms of chronic stress and anxiety [4] and improve a person’s general well-being [5]. Plus, unlike other natural ingredients with mental health benefits (like St. John’s Wort) ashwagandha may be used safely along with certain mental health medications like SSRIs. [6] We use it in our Core and Sleep supplements to help support stress management and mental health.

Green Tea: Green tea is rich in antioxidants that have been shown to reduce inflammation, boost cognition, and benefit skin health. [7] Green tea extract (GTE), which is made from green tea leaves, has been found to improve cognitive performance and working memory in older women [8], which is why we put it in small doses in our Focus supplement.

Melatonin: This hormone is naturally produced by your body to help regulate your sleep-wake cycle. During the menopause transition, your body starts to make less of it, which may affect your sleep.[9] In small doses (just 2 mg per day), research shows that melatonin can improve sleep quality of postmenopausal women with sleep issues with minimal side effects — which is why we included it in our Sleep Enhancing supplement.[10]

the science of our products

V Relief Serum


Kindra’s V Relief Serum uses a patent-pending formula designed to reduce irritation and sensitivity in intimate skin caused by vulvovaginal dryness or atrophy.


Vaginal and vulvar skin goes through significant changes during the menopause transition thanks to the decline of estrogen levels. Estrogen helps keep intimate areas lubricated, flexible, and strong; without estrogen, those areas become thinner and drier. [1] With less estrogen, vaginal pH increases, making the area less acidic [2] and more vulnerable to infections [3].

These changes over time may cause vulvovaginal atrophy, also known as the genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM). [4] It has many different symptoms, including vulvovaginal dryness (VVD), vaginal pain, itching, or burning, pain during sex, decreased libido, and stress incontinence. [5] Many postmenopausal women have at least one symptom of GSM; your case of GSM is considered more severe the more symptoms you have. [6]


For women with severe GSM, intimate skin is incredibly sensitive and fragile, and may tear or bleed easily. This makes even a standard OB/GYN exam painful and traumatic, and can significantly impact day-to-day life. [7]


We created our serum in response to customers looking for something to soothe their severely sensitive, irritated skin. Our formula targets pain receptors in the vulva and vaginal opening to reduce pain and sensitivity in these areas. We also ensured the product’s pH was compatible with the postmenopausal vaginal environment — and that the ingredients list was free of parabens, phthalates, sulfates, and gluten — to reduce the risk of further irritation.


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93% of women who used the serum daily for 4 weeks reported feeling more comfortable after use.*

Sensamone P5: This is a biomimetic peptide derived from a protein in sea anemones. This protein can block a pain receptor in the skin called TRPV1, reducing inflammation and sensitivity in inflamed skin. [8] Research has found using SensAmone P5 resulted in a significant reduction of skin sensitivity (including stinging, burning, and itching) when used twice daily for 28 days.[9] We included it in our patent-pending Serum to help provide immediate relief from the pain and discomfort of severe GSM and VVD.


the science of our products

Soothe Bath Soak

Kindra currently offers three supplements to support your health and minimize certain symptoms during the menopause transition and beyond. They are: The Core Supplement: Taken daily to support healthy circulation, mental clarity, skin health, stress reduction, and libido. The Sleep Enhancing Supplement: Taken as needed to address poor sleep and night sweats. The Focus Supplement: Taken daily to help manage brain fog, fatigue, hot flashes, and night sweats.

Kindra’s Daily Vaginal Lotion restores moisture to your vulvar and vaginal tissues while repairing the skin barrier in those areas. It can help address some key symptoms of vulvar/vaginal dryness or atrophy that can happen during or after menopause, such as mild to moderate dryness, discomfort, and painful intimacy.

Kindra’s Daily Vaginal Lotion restores moisture to your vulvar and vaginal tissues while repairing the skin barrier in those areas. It can help address some key symptoms of vulvar/vaginal dryness or atrophy that can happen during or after menopause, such as mild to moderate dryness, discomfort, and painful intimacy.

Kindra’s Daily Vaginal Lotion restores moisture to your vulvar and vaginal tissues while repairing the skin barrier in those areas. It can help address some key symptoms of vulvar/vaginal dryness or atrophy that can happen during or after menopause, such as mild to moderate dryness, discomfort, and painful intimacy.

the science of our products

Cool Down Mist

Kindra’s Daily Vaginal Lotion restores moisture to your vulvar and vaginal tissues while repairing the skin barrier in those areas. It can help address some key symptoms of vulvar/vaginal dryness or atrophy that can happen during or after menopause, such as mild to moderate dryness, discomfort, and painful intimacy.

Kindra’s Daily Vaginal Lotion restores moisture to your vulvar and vaginal tissues while repairing the skin barrier in those areas. It can help address some key symptoms of vulvar/vaginal dryness or atrophy that can happen during or after menopause, such as mild to moderate dryness, discomfort, and painful intimacy.

Kindra’s Daily Vaginal Lotion restores moisture to your vulvar and vaginal tissues while repairing the skin barrier in those areas. It can help address some key symptoms of vulvar/vaginal dryness or atrophy that can happen during or after menopause, such as mild to moderate dryness, discomfort, and painful intimacy.

Kindra’s Daily Vaginal Lotion restores moisture to your vulvar and vaginal tissues while repairing the skin barrier in those areas. It can help address some key symptoms of vulvar/vaginal dryness or atrophy that can happen during or after menopause, such as mild to moderate dryness, discomfort, and painful intimacy.

Common Questions

we've got answers

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See All FAQs

References & Sources

1. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), FAQs: The Menopause Years, November 2021.

2. National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, What Is Menopause?, September 2021.

3. ACOG, FAQs: The Menopause Years, November 2021.

4. The North American Menopause Society, Changes at Midlife, Undated.

5. The North American Menopause Society, Menopause FAQs: Premature, Early, and Induced Menopause, Undated.

6. NAMS, Changes at Midlife, Undated.

7. Cleveland Clinic, Postmenopause, October 2021.

8. Endocrine Society, Reproductive Hormones, January 2022.

9. The North American Menopause Society, Changes in Hormone Levels, Undated.

10. Cleveland Clinic, Estrogen: What It Does and 5 Benefits, January 2022.

11. Irene Su, H. and Freeman, E., Minerva Ginecologica, Hormone Changes Associated With the Menopausal Transition, December 2009.

12. NAMS, Changes in Hormone Levels, Undated.

13. Society for Endocrinology, Progesterone, July 2021.

14. Harvard Health, Perimenopause: Rocky Road to Menopause, April 2020.

15. NAMS, Changes in Hormone Levels, Undated.

16. Society for Endocrinology, Follicle Stimulating Hormone, February 2018.

17. Society for Endocrinology, Menopause, April 2022.

18. NIH, What Is Menopause?, September 2021.

19. Society for Endocrinology, Menopause, April 2022.

20. North American Menopause Society, How Do I Know When I’m in Menopause?, Undated.

21. Cleveland Clinic, Perimenopause, October 2021.

22. ACOG, FAQs: The Menopause Years, November 2021.

23. NIH, What Is Menopause?, September 2021.

24. Mayo Clinic, Hot Flashes, May 2022.

25. Avis, N. et. al., JAMA Internal Medicine, Duration of Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms Over the Menopause Transition, April 2015.

26. Cleveland Clinic, Vaginal Atrophy, October 2020.

27. Angelou, K. et. al., Cureus, The Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause: An Overview of the Recent Data, April 2020.

28. Dalal, P. and Agarwal, M., Indian Journal of Psychiatry, Postmenopausal Syndrome, July 2015.

29. Kulkarni, J. et. al., Translational Psychiatry, Development and Validation of a New Rating Scale for Perimenopausal Depression–The Meno-D, June 2018.

30. Born, L. et. al., Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, A New, Female-Specific Irritability Rating Scale, July 2008.

31. Del Rio, J. et. al., Frontiers in Public Health, Steroid Hormones and Their Action in Women’s Brains: The Importance of Hormonal Balance, May 2018.

32. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Sleep Duration and Quality Among Women Aged 40-59, by Menopausal Status, September 2017.

33. Jehan, S. et. al., Journal of Sleep Disorders and Therapy, Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women, August 2015.

34. El Khoudary, S. et. al., Circulation, Menopause Transition and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Implications for Timing of Early Prevention: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, November 2020.

35. Lisabeth, L. and Bushnell, C., The Lancet Neurology, Stroke Risk in Women: The Role of Menopause and Hormone Therapy, January 2012.

36. Ji, M. and Yu, Q., Chronic Diseases and Translational Medicine, Primary Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women, March 2015.

37. American Heart Association, Menopause and Cardiovascular Risk, July 2021.

38. Cleveland Clinic, Vaginal Atrophy, October 2020.

39. Mayo Clinic, Vaginal Atrophy, September 2021.

40. Angelou, K. et. al., Cureus, The Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause: An Overview of the Recent Data, April 2020.

41. Moral, E. et. al., Climateric, Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause: Prevalence and Quality of Life in Spanish Postmenopausal Women: The GENISSE Study, April 2018.

42. Mitro, S. et. al., Women’s Midlife Health, Chronic Vulvar Pain in a Cohort of Post-Menopausal Women: Atrophy or Vulvodynia?, June 2016.

43. North American Menopause Society, Pain the Vulva or Pelvis, Undated.

44. Mayo Clinic, Vulvodynia, July 2020.

45. Cleveland Clinic, Hormone Therapy for Menopause Symptoms, June 2021.

46. Gambacciani, M. and Levancini, M., Menopause Review, Hormone Replacement Therapy and the Prevention of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis, September 2014.

47. Cleveland Clinic, Hormone Therapy for Menopause Symptoms, June 2021.

48. ACOG, FAQs: The Menopause Years, November 2021.

49. Rossouw, J. et. al., JAMA, Risks and Benefits of Estrogen Plus Progestin in Healthy Postmenopausal Women: Principal Results From the Women's Health Initiative Randomized Controlled Trial, July 2002.

50. Cagnacci, A. and Venier, M., Medicina, The Controversial History of Hormonal Replacement Therapy, September 2019.

51. Craig, M. et. al., The Lancet Neurology, The Women's Health Initiative Memory Study: Findings and Implications for Treatment, March 2005.

52. Flores, V. et. al., Endocrine Reviews, Hormone Therapy in Menopause: Concepts, Controversies, and Approach to Treatment, December 2021.

53. ACOG, FAQs: The Menopause Years, November 2021.

54. North American Menopause Society, The Experts Do Agree About Hormone Therapy, Undated.

55. Langer, R. et. al., Climacteric, Hormone Replacement Therapy–Where Are We Now?, January 2021.

56. Flores, V. et. al., Endocrine Reviews, Hormone Therapy in Menopause: Concepts, Controversies, and Approach to Treatment, December 2021.

57. Cleveland Clinic, Hormone Therapy for Menopause Symptoms, June 2021.

58. North American Menopause Society, Hormone Therapy: Benefits & Risks, Undated.

59. Cleveland Clinic, Hormone Therapy for Menopause Symptoms, June 2021.

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